DNA damage in telophase leads to coalescence between segregated sister chromatid loci.

Jessel Ayra-Plasencia, Félix Machín

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Nov 27, 2018
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Received Date: 16th October 18

The generation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) pose a high risk for the maintenance of the genome. Cells repair DSBs through two major mechanisms: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). HR is usually preferred when a sister chromatid is available, thus cells have coupled the activity of the cycling dependent kinase (CDK) to the selection of HR (Symington et al. 2014). Paradoxically, there is a window in the cell cycle where CDK is high despite a sister chromatid is not physically available for HR: late anaphase/telophase. We have here studied in budding yeast the response to DSBs generated in telophase by means of the radiomimetic drug phleomycin. We first show that phleomycin treatment activates the DNA damage response and leads to a delay in the telophase-to-G1 transition. Outstandingly, we also found a partial reversion of sister chromatid segregation, which includes approximation of spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and sister centromeres, de novo formation of anaphase bridges, trafficking of DNA back and forth through the cytokinetic plane and events of coalescence between segregated sister telomeres. We importantly show that phleomycin promotes a massive change in the structure and dynamic of mitotic microtubules (MTs), which coincides with dephosphorylation and re-localization of kinesin-5 Cin8. We propose that anaphase is not entirely irreversible and that there could still be a window to repair DSBs using the sister chromatid after segregation.

Read in full at bioRxiv.

This is an abstract of a preprint hosted on an independent third party site. It has not been peer reviewed but is currently under consideration at Nature Communications.

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