PDX models reflect the proteome landscape of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia but divert in select pathways

Anuli C. Uzozie, Enes K. Ergin, Nina Rolf, Janice Tsui, Amanda Lorentzian, Samuel S. Weng, Lorenz Nierves, Theodore G. Smith, C. James Lim, Christopher A. Maxwell, Gregor S.D. Reid, Philipp F. Lange

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Dec 23, 2019
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Received Date: 5th December 19

Murine xenografts of pediatric leukemia are known to accurately recapitulate genomic aberrations. How this translates to the functional capacity of the proteome is unknown. Here, we studied global protein abundance, phosphorylation, and proteolytic processing in 11 pediatric B- and T- cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients and 19 corresponding xenografts. Protein level differences that stratified pediatric disease subtypes at diagnostic and relapse stages were largely recapitulated in xenograft models. Patient xenografts lacked multiple human leukocyte antigens, and complement proteins, and presented incomplete response mechanisms to the host immune system which is absent in the murine model. The dominant expression of MKI67 and cell cycle proteins indicated a high proliferative capacity of xenografted cells residing in the spleen. Structural genomic changes and mutations found in patients were reflected at the protein level. The post-translational modification landscape is shaped by leukemia type and host and only to a limited degree by the patient of origin. This study portrays how genomic and host factors shape protein and post-translational modification landscapes differently, and confirms murine patient-derived xenograft as competent model system while highlighting important areas of diverging biology.

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This is an abstract of a preprint hosted on an independent third party site. It has not been peer reviewed but is currently under consideration at Nature Communications.

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